The Interim, or Provisional government for the Confederate States of America, has been temporarily established to provide for our present needs, acting in, or for the intervening period between the time our government for The Confederate States of America was forced into a state of exile in 1865, and the time a convention can be held to restore our government from its forced state of exile.

Provi’sional. aJj, Iproiji/iciiel, French ;
from fro-vifioa.] Temporarily established
; provided for present need.

in·ter·im
ˈin(t)ərəm
In or for the intervening period; provisional or temporary.

Here we begin with the understanding of our Interim/Provisional governments future conventions authority and purpose as explained by JOHN ALEXANDER JAMIESON, LL. D.
LATE JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.
Copyright, 1887,
BY JOHN A. JAMIESON
The Riverside Prea, Camtmdgt: Blectrotyped and Printed by H. 0. Houghton & Co.
Updated by Vance J. Beaudreau, Chief Justice Constitutional Court, Confederate States of America

PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT.
A characteristic of this type of convention is that they are dehors (beyond) the law; that they derive their powers from necessity and from revolutionary force and violence; that they are possessed, accordingly, to an indeterminate extent, depending on the circumstances of each case, of governmental powers: finally, that they are not subaltern (controlled) or ancillary to any other institution whatever, but lords paramount of the entire political domain.
To this may be added, that there are of no definite numbers or organization, comprising sometimes one and sometimes several chambers, and composed indifferently of ex-officers of the government that was, of persons possessing neither office nor the qualifications requisite for it, nor even for the elective franchise, or of a mixture of all of these together, as chance may have tossed them to the surface. The general purpose of the Revolutionary Convention, moreover, is to bridge over a chasm between two orders of things: an order that has expired or been extinguished, or become intolerable to the people and an order emerging, under the operation of existing social forces, to replace it. In short, a Revolutionary Convention is simply a PROVISIONAL GOVERNMENT.
Examples of the Revolutionary Conventions have been numerous in the political history of the world, and becoming daily more so. Among the most famous and, for our purpose, the most important, are those held in England in 1660 and in 1689 and in the Republic of Texas in 1861.

 

Image is that of Samuel Johnson, Johnson’s Dictionary of The English Language (1755) edition.